All U.S Extracurricular Courses

A

The ACT Math and Science is designed to prepare the student to do well on the ACT exam. The course will familiarize the student with the format of the math and science sections of the ACT and will teach the student testing techniques and strategies. The course will also include a comprehensive review of basic mathematics, algebra, geometry, statistics, and other math concepts needed for success on the ACT as well as all of the science topics covered on the ACT. This class is taught by NSA faculty but also extensively uses an outside online source so students can customize their practice and review, according to their individual strengths and weaknesses.

In addition to reviewing the basic skills needed, students will learn test-taking strategies specific to the ACT exam. Strategies for reading quickly and efficiently are emphasized, and exercises are provided to build vocabulary, an important asset for the ACT. Students receive instruction and practice on planning and executing essays within the short time allotted on the test.

What comes to mind when you think of the word marketing? Perhaps a familiar television jingle begins to play in your head? Or maybe you think of the irritating phone calls from people wanting to sell you something you already have? No matter what your feelings, there’s no denying the sheer magnitude and power of the marketing industry. Every year companies spend approximately $200 billion promoting their products and services—and that’s just in the United States alone! You’re familiar with what it’s like on the receiving end of a company’s marketing efforts, but what’s it like on the other side? In Advertising and Sales Promotions, you’ll see exactly how marketing campaigns, ads, and commercials are conceived and brought to life and even meet some of the creative folks who produce that memorable media. You’ll learn about different career opportunities in the field and discover ways that you too can be a part of this exciting, fast-paced industry

The first semester of Art History begins with a general discussion of art and the place of art in the development of human civilization. Students study the oldest known art forms and conduct a global survey of historical art from the dawn of human history through the Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic periods. The second semester of the course begins with the Renaissance period and progresses through time to conclude with a study of modern art from America and Mexico. Throughout both semesters, students create simple art projects based on the styles and movements they have studied and use web resources from the greatest museums in the world including the Guggenheim, the Met, and the Louvre.

This course covers all topics of the calculus of functions of a single variable as described in the AP Calculus AB topic outline in the AP Calculus Course Description. This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts covered in the first semester of university calculus and half of the second semester of university calculus. Multiple experiences in the methods and applications of those concepts and the Rule of Four are also stressed throughout the course. Students are trained to express all solutions geometrically, numerically, analytically, and to interpret these findings verbally.

Major topics covered include Functions, Graphs, Limits, Derivatives, Integrals, and Applications of Integrals. Technology and graphing calculators are used extensively in this course to reinforce the concepts covered. All students must possess a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-89 graphing calculator.

This course covers all topics of Calculus of functions of a single variable as described in the AP Calculus BC topic outline in the AP Calculus Course Description.

Designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts covered in the first two semesters of college level Calculus and to provide the student with multiple experiences in the methods and applications of those concepts, the Rule of Four is stressed throughout the course.

Students are trained to express all solutions geometrically, numerically, analytically, and to interpret these findings verbally. Technology and graphing calculators are used extensively in this course to reinforce the concepts covered. All students must possess a TI-83, TI-84 or TI-89 graphing calculator.

In this course students will build their understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. After studying chemical reactions and electrochemistry, students move on to understand how the chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and arrangements of the molecules, as well as the forces between those molecules. Students will examine the laws of thermodynamics, molecular collisions, and the reorganization of matter in order to understand how changes in matter take place. Finally, students will explore chemical equilibria including acidbase equilibria. This course prepares students for further study in science, the health sciences, or engineering. Requirement: Students must purchase a lab kit at an additional cost. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry, Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2.

This is a college-level course covering the development of the modern world from approximately 1350 to the present day. The areas of concentration include historical, political, and economic history coupled with an intense study of cultural and intellectual institutions and their development.

This course is taught at the college level and is designed to prepare students to successfully complete the AP European History Exam. Students will develop an understanding of some of the principle themes of modern history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to analyze and express historical understanding in writing. Through using a variety of sources, this course will emphasize reading comprehension, writing, research, and analytical skills.

This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Additionally, students will learn to identify and analyze environmental problems that are natural and human-made. Students will evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing problems.

AP US Government and Politics includes a brief comparative study of government, and then an in-depth study of American government on the federal, state, and local levels. This includes its complex interworking, checks and balances, political responsibilities, structures, functions, and authority.

This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in both the United States and around the world. Students will learn of God’s sovereignty in all forms of government, their responsibilities, how to practically evaluate political issues, and how to influence one’s own government.

This course covers a chronological history of the United States using a variety of sources including primary sources, maps, articles, and a basic text used for basic background information.

The course will cover the major trends of political, social, intellectual, economic, and diplomatic history, as well as familiarize the student with the geographical development and expansion of the United States. A major goal is to develop analytical and interpretive skills through the lens of the Biblical worldview. Particular emphasis is placed on training students to excel in the skills of critical reading and writing, as well as critical interpretation of arguments. Students will investigate people, places, worldviews, and events that have most influenced U.S. history. This course is taught at the college level and is designed to prepare students to successfully complete the AP US History Exam.

This course spans the Neolithic age to the present in a rigorous academic format organized by chronological periods and viewed through fundamental concepts and course themes. Students analyze the causes and processes of continuity and change across historical periods. Themes include human-environment interaction, cultures, expansion and conflict, political and social structures, and economic systems. In addition to mastering historical content, students cultivate historical thinking skills that involve crafting arguments based on evidence, identifying causation, comparing and supplying context for events and phenomenon, and developing historical interpretation.

This course covers all topics of the calculus of functions of a single variable as described in the AP Calculus AB topic outline in the AP Calculus Course Description. This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts covered in the first semester of university calculus and half of the second semester of university calculus. Multiple experiences in the methods and applications of those concepts and the Rule of Four are also stressed throughout the course. Students are trained to express all solutions geometrically, numerically, analytically, and to interpret these findings verbally.

Major topics covered include Functions, Graphs, Limits, Derivatives, Integrals, and Applications of Integrals. Technology and graphing calculators are used extensively in this course to reinforce the concepts covered. All students must possess a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-89 graphing calculator.

This course covers all topics of Calculus of functions of a single variable as described in the AP Calculus BC topic outline in the AP Calculus Course Description.

Designed to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts covered in the first two semesters of college level Calculus and to provide the student with multiple experiences in the methods and applications of those concepts, the Rule of Four is stressed throughout the course.

Students are trained to express all solutions geometrically, numerically, analytically, and to interpret these findings verbally. Technology and graphing calculators are used extensively in this course to reinforce the concepts covered. All students must possess a TI-83, TI-84 or TI-89 graphing calculator.

This course teaches programming in JAVA while preparing the student for the Advanced Placement exam.

AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP CSP prepares students for college and career. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and explores the impact computing and technology has on our society. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, the Code HS AP Computer Science Principles course gives students the opportunity to explore several important topics of computing using their own ideas and creativity, use the power of computing to create artifacts of personal value, and develop an interest in computer science that will foster further endeavors in the field.

AP Literature is designed to strengthen the student’s ability to read and interpret the various genres and motifs in literature. This class will help prepare the student to take the AP exam in Literature at the end of the school year. Students will write multiple essays utilizing excellent analysis, structure and phrasing. Literature readings will be mainly from British Literature, with selections from World Literature added. This class covers many of the literary pieces that the British Literature class covers, but it does so at a higher level as it covers the worldviews of each major literary movement.

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The reading and writing assignments in this course will make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as how language choice contributes to the effectiveness of a piece of written work. This course is considered the equivalent of a college-level composition course. As such, students will be held to rigorous expectations and high standards of accountability. At the end of the course, they will be prepared not only for the AP exam in English Language and Composition, but any situation requiring critical thinking, clear communication, and analysis of multiple – and sometimes conflicting -viewpoints.

This is a college-level course covering the development of the modern world from approximately 1350 to the present day. The areas of concentration include historical, political, and economic history coupled with an intense study of cultural and intellectual institutions and their development. Students will develop an understanding of some of the principle themes of modern history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to analyze and express historical understanding in writing. Through using a variety of sources, this course will emphasize reading comprehension, writing, research, and analytical skills. This course is taught at the college level and is designed to prepare students to successfully complete the AP European History Exam. Students will develop an understanding of some of the principle themes of modern history, an ability to analyze historical evidence, and an ability to analyze and express historical understanding in writing.

The equivalent of a college-level language course, AP French prepares students for the AP Exam and for further study of French language, culture, or literature.

This course enables students to practice perfecting their French speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. They study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises. By the end of the course, students will have an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb forms and tenses.

The AP French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP French Language and Culture test. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.

The course teaches students how to use and interpret maps, data sets, and geographic models (GIS, aerial photographs, and satellite images).

The course teaches spatial relationships at different scales ranging from the local to the global. The course teaches the use of spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human organization of space. The course will also include topics such as: Nature of and Perspectives on Geography, Population, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Agricultural and Rural Land Use, Industrialization and Economic Development, and Cities and Urban Land Use.

AP Macroeconomics is a course designed is to give students an understanding of the principles of economics as applied to the economy as a whole. Specific areas of focus include basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial sector, inflation, unemployment, stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance issues. Learning with be applied and evaluated through a wide range of mediums including; activity labs, tests, quizzes, multimedia, texts, charts, graphs, research projects, participation, and life skills. This course is also designed to prepare students to successfully complete the AP Macroeconomics exam.

AP Microeconomics is a course designed to give students an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Learning will be applied and evaluated through a wide range of mediums including; activity labs, tests, quizzes, multimedia, texts, charts, graphs, research projects, participation, and life skills. This course is also designed to prepare students to successfully complete the AP Microeconomics exam.

The course provides students with an introductory experience in the concepts and methods of physical analysis, focused on classical mechanics and simple electrical circuits.  Building the ability to reason qualitatively and quantitatively is a primary focus, with inquiry and investigation, modeling and diagramming, symbolic algebra, unit analysis, communication and argumentation, laboratory techniques, data analysis, and integration and application of concepts as emphasized skills.

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college level course. Students receive an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. They explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists, and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further studies in psychology and life sciences.

This course enables students to practice perfecting their Spanish speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. They study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and then apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises.

Students develop an expansive vocabulary and a solid, working knowledge of all verb forms and tenses. AP Spanish helps prepare students for the AP Exam and for further study of Spanish language, culture, or literature.

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Statistics-the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties – plays an important role in many fields. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research.

Students learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research.

Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

Monet, Matisse, Picasso, and contemporary artists are revealed and explored by members in the Art Club. Students gain inspiration from artists across the globe and varying eras. Members also share their own artistic expressions and endeavors culminating in a virtual art club portfolio distributed school wide. Art Club advisors share their passion of art and creative expression while students lead the meetings and share their artistic expressions.

Club Members discuss space-related news, photography, and insights about astronomy including solar systems, planets, stars, galaxies, space travel, astrophysics, and more.

B

Can we bring back extinct species? Will the cures for cancer, malaria, and other diseases come from the combination of natural materials and new technologies? How is science changing the foods we eat? Welcome to the world of biotechnology! In this course, you will explore the history of biotechnology, including early attempts at food preservation, the development of antibiotics, and changes to food crops around the world. You’ll also learn more about some of the challenges of biotechnology, such as the growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and questions about the safety of commercially produced genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Finally, you’ll research new biotechnologies and how they are changing the world we live in.

C

When you think about your future, what careers do you see? Police officer? Nurse? Farmer? Restaurant manager? In Middle School Career Exploration, you’ll explore careers in more than 15 different career areas. From the energy field to sales and from law to transportation, you’ll learn more about what careers are available and what you need to do to be a success. In addition, you’ll examine how to choose the career that is best for you based on your own unique personality and interests. And you can begin developing your leadership skills now. Middle School Career Exploration will help you prepare for your future now! What do want to be?

The computer science curriculum teaches the foundations of computer science and basic programming. Once students complete the computer science and coding course, they will have learned material equivalent to a college introductory course in computer science and be able to program in JavaScript.

Each day, we are surrounded by technology and engineering projects. From our phones to the bridges we drive over, engineering and technology influence many parts of our lives. In Concepts of Engineering and Technology, you will learn more about engineering and technology careers and what skills and knowledge you’ll need to succeed in these fields. You’ll explore innovative and cutting edge projects that are changing the world we live in and examine the design and prototype development process. Concepts of Engineering and Technology will also help you understand the emerging issues in this exciting career field.

Real world experiences would not be complete without a little thinking outside the box. Every student has a spark of creativity within, hidden or known, that just has to be released. To do this, members perceive from a variety of different angles to enhance or free that creative spark. Members engage, role play, and reconnoiter through a variety of creative exercises, complete tasks individually, and report back with results. No creative thinking exercise would be complete without a full circle moment bringing students back to that unique starting point of thinking the next great thought, that leads to the execution of a great idea, that can change the world.

In today’s world, crime and deviant behavior rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. This course examines criminology, the study of crime. Why do some individuals commit crimes and others do not? What aspects in our culture and society promote deviance? Why do punishments vary for the same crime? What factors, from arrest to punishment, shape the criminal case process?

Most of us have watched a sensationalized crime show at one time, but do we really know how things work behind those dreaded prison bars? The criminal justice system is a very complex and serious field that requires many dedicated people willing to pursue equal justice for all. Careers in Criminal Justice will begin to illuminate exactly what those career choices are and how the juvenile justice system, the correctional system, and the trial process all work together to maintain social order. Find out exactly what happens when the television show ends and reality begins.

The Creative Computing Club explores the merging of creativity and technology. Members engage in meaningful and critical discussions about the world of computing. From coding to the Maker Movement; from Google’s CS-First to the digital worlds of Minecraft, this club will explore how computers play a vital and vibrant part of everyday life in preparation for college, career and beyond in the 21st century.

D

Using contemporary topics introduced by the advisor, club members then vote, choose, briefly research, take a pro or con position, gather their arguments, and debate the topic until consensus and resolution is reached. Proper debate techniques are used, as well as expanding into the unique opportunities available in a virtual setting as students explore civic literacy, global awareness, and individual liberties through the utilization of critical, creative, and innovative thinking. This club meets in a supervised setting with feedback and guidance from an advisor.

In this class we will learn the difference between a photograph and a snapshot. We will learn the basics in black and white photography, including care & handling of a digital camera, cleaning, composition, exposure, and basic image manipulation.

Digital Photography I focuses on the basics of photography including aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students are introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images with various subjects including people, landscapes, close-up photos, and action shots.

Digital Photography I focuses on the basics of photography including aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students are introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images with various subjects including people, landscapes, close-up photos, and action shots.

E

Do you dream of owning your own business? This course can give you a head start in learning about what you’ll need to own and operate a successful business. Students will explore creating a business plan, financing a business, and pricing products and services.

This club is for those who love nature, Earth, and seek to find a closer connection with Earth, explore environmental literacy and environs; individually and as a community.

During this course, students will learn that they can and do make a difference through their actions. They will also receive practical advice for protecting and improving the environment. The first semester of the course focuses on the living Earth, both terrestrial and aquatic. The second semester focuses on Earth’s place in the universe, the history of life on Earth, the geological time scale, great turning points in Earth’s history, atmospheric history, and mass extinctions. Endorsed by UNEP, Kids4Earth is aligned to North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) standards for environmental education and California standards for life science education.

What comes to mind when you hear the word ‘music’? The word music means something different to everyone. Which is why in this Music course, there’s a little bit of something for everyone! You will learn about how we hear music; how music affects our lives; important elements of music like rhythm, pitch, and harmony; different musical genres; singing and your voice; various instruments; music composition; and the history and culture of music over the years.

F

The Fashion Club takes a closer look at the ever-changing fashion industry and combines the creative and productive aspects that are part of contemporary culture. Members share original designs, reveal and review current fashion trends, designs from fashion week, and explore red carpet fashion. Between meetings members work independently creating original designs which they share at each meeting. They challenge themselves and each other by creating inspiration boards resulting in feedback, support, and encouragement from fellow fashionistas.

Members of the Film Production and Screen writing Club will explore elements of the filmmaking process including writing, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing. In the film industry, the screenplay is referred to as the “master document.” Without a script, no other position in the industry would exist. It is in story development and the creation of the three-act screenplay that this club will focus time throughout the school year. The development of writing skills will serve students, regardless of their future interests or career paths. Club members will utilize the teachings of Robert McKee and the late Syd Field; referencing Robert McKee’s “Ten Screenwriting Commandments,” his book “Story,” as well as Field’s screenplay outline.

Bon jour! French Club members revel in the emersion into French culture, cuisine, and even discuss the beauties of the French countryside as all meetings are exclusively French speaking. Members hone skills already acquired in French world language courses and embark on a journey of France, its landscapes, and all aspects of its culture. Viva la France!

Our personal financial habits affect our financial future, and we can make smart decisions with our money in the areas of saving, spending, and investing. This course introduces students to basic financial habits such as setting financial goals, budgeting, and creating financial plans. Students will learn about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit, and money management. The course also addresses how occupations and educational choices can influence personal financial planning, and how individuals can protect themselves from identity theft.

Fingerprints, blood spatter, DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making the use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those responsible for the crimes. This course will cover the usage of some of these techniques as they relate to the investigation of crime scenes.

Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

G

Are you a gamer? Do you enjoy playing video games or coding? Does the idea of creating and designing your own virtual world excite you? If so, this is the course for you! Tap into your creative and technical skills as you learn about the many aspects involved with designing video games. You will learn about video game software and hardware, various gaming platforms, necessary technical skills, troubleshooting and internet safety techniques, and even the history of gaming. And to top it all off, you’ll even have the opportunity to create your very own plan for a 2D video game! Turn your hobby into a potential career and go from simply being a player in a virtual world to actually creating one!

From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction.

Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

H

One of the fastest-growing industries in all the world, this course introduces students to all aspects of the industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and more. Topics include key hospitality issues, development and management of tourist locations, event planning, and marketing.

I

In MYP arts,students function as artists as well as learners of the arts.Artists have to be curious.By deceloping curiosity about themselves,others and the world students become effective learners,inquirers and creative porblem-solvers.Students create,perform and present arts in ways that engage and convey feelings,experiences and ideas.Through this practice,students acquire new skills and master those developed in prior learning

The MYP individuals and societies subject group incorporates disciplines traditionally studied under humanities and social sciences. This subject group encourages learners to respect and understand the world around them, and equips them with the necessary skills to inquire into historical, geographical, political, social, economic, and culture factors that affect individuals, societies and environments.

Design,and the resultant development of new technologies,has given rise to profound changse in society,transforming how we access and process informantion,adapt our enviroment,communicate with others,solve porblems,work and live.MYP design challenges students to apply practical and creative-thinking skills to solve design problems;encour-ages students to explore the role of design in historical and cintem-porary contexts;and raises students’ awareness of their responsibilities when making design decisions and taking action.

The ability to communicate in more than one language is essential to the concept of an interational education that promotes intercultural understanding,and is central to the IB’s mission.The study of additional languages in the MYP provides students with the opportunity to develop insights into the features,processes and craft of language and the concept of culture,and to realize that there are dicerse ways of living,behaving and viewing the world

The study of mathematics is a fundamental part of a balanced education. It promotes a powerful universal language, analytical reasoning and problem-solving skills that contribute to the development of logical, abstract and critical thinking. The MYP mathematics courses promote both inquiry and application, helping students to develop problem-solving techniques that transcend the discipline and are useful in the world outside school.

Interdisciplinary learning can take place between different subject groups and between different disciplines within a subject group to encourage broader perspectives on complex issues and deeper levels of analysis and deeper levels of analysis and synthesis.Interdisciplinary connections must be meaningful.

The MYP personal project is a student-centred and age-appropriate practical exploration in which students consolidate their learning throughout the programme. This long-term project is designed as an independent learning experience of approximately 25 hours. The personal project formally assesses students’ ATL skills for self-management, research, communication, critical and creative thinking, and collaboration.

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active while developing the motivation for making healthy and informed life choices. To this end, physical and health education courses foster the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes contributing to a balanced and healthy lifestyle.

With inquiry at the core, the MYP sciences framework aims to guide students to independently and collaboratively investigate issues through research, observation and experimentation. The MYP sciences curriculum explores the connections between science and everyday life.

From geography to culture, global business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course is designed to help students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

This course is an introductory study of the basic principles of accounting. Beginning with a proprietorship, students will be guided step-by-step through a complete accounting cycle: analyzing transactions, journalizing, posting, petty cash, financial statements, and adjusting and closing entries. Students will then complete the same cycle with more complicated business structures.

Agriculture has played an important role in the lives of humans for thousands of years. It has fed us and given us materials that have helped us survive. Today, scientists and practitioners are working to improve and better understand agriculture and how it can be used to continue to sustain human life. In this course, students learn about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources. Students also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics, and world trade.

Forests and other natural resources play an important role in our world, from providing lumber and paper products to providing habitat for birds and animals. In the Introduction to Forestry and Natural Resources course, you’ll learn more about forest ecology, management, and conservation. You’ll explore topics such as environmental policy, land use, water resources, and wildlife management. Finally, you’ll learn more about forestry related careers and important issues facing forestry professionals today.

Think about the last time you visited your favorite store. Have you ever wondered how the products you buy make it to the store shelves? Whether its video games, clothing, or sports equipment, the goods we purchase must go through a manufacturing process before they can be marketed and sold. In this course, you’ll learn about the types of manufacturing systems and processes used to create the products we buy every day. You’ll also be introduced to the various career opportunities in the manufacturing industry including those for engineers, technicians, and supervisors. As a culminating project, you’ll plan your own manufacturing process for a new product or invention! If you thought manufacturing was little more than mundane assembly lines, this course will show you just how exciting and fruitful the industry can be.

Interested in transforming energy? With concerns about climate change and growing populations’ effects on traditional energy supplies, scientists, governments, and societies are increasingly turning to renewable and innovative energy sources. In the Introduction to Renewable Technologies course, you’ll learn all about the cutting-edge field of renewable energy and the exciting new technologies that are making it possible. You’ll explore new ways of generating energy and storing that energy, from biofuels to high-capacity batteries and smart electrical grids. You’ll also learn more about the environmental and social effects of renewable technologies and examine how people’s energy decisions impact policies.

J

Who? What? When? Where? Journalism provides us with the answers to these questions for the events that affect our lives. In this course, students will learn how to gather information, organize ideas, format stories for different forms of news media, and edit their stories for publication. The course will also examine the historical development of journalism and the role of journalism in society.

Are you always the first one to know what’s going on at school or in your town? If so, you are just the kind of person every online, print, and broadcast news outlet is searching for, and Journalism: Investigating the Truth is the perfect course for you! Learn how to write a lead that really “grabs” your readers, interview sources effectively, and write engaging news stories. You will explore the history of journalism and how the modern world of social media can provide an excellent platform for news. Turn your writing, photography, and collaborative skills into an exciting and rewarding journalism career.

L

Every society has laws that citizens must follow; this course aims to examine the purpose and function of laws in our society. From traffic laws to regulated government operations, laws help provide society with order and structure. By understanding the workings of course systems and how laws are carried out, we become more informed and responsible citizens in our communities and our world.

Leadership Skills Development takes students on a leadership journey, where they explore their own story and goals, and learn how to achieve things they never thought possible. During segment 1, students will explore their own personality strengths, learn how to set MAD goals, and find their North. They will learn about their success GPA, which is more than just the grades they receive, but also includes their ability to build their awareness, social, and solution powers. During segment 2, students have the opportunity to use what they have learned and apply tools and strategies to fictitious case studies. The course ends with students researching, planning, and participating in a service project that will benefit their school and/or community.

M

Imagine preparing for the global experience as a member of the United Nations who strives for peace and balance among cultures around the world. This club engages in an authentic simulation of the United Nations (UN) by learning about the UN system, skills of debate, compromise, conflict resolution, and negotiation. Model UN team members meet twice a month to explore and reveal the workings of world diplomacy through the lens of current events.

N

This is an eye-opening survey course designed to introduce nanotechnology. For each topic, the course presents the fundamental scientific principles of nanomaterials and discusses the engineering of these nanomaterials into functional devices, which will become the next generation of consumer products. Each lecture emphasizes the science underlying the most advanced applications of nanotechnology which, as we will see, can be explained using the existing laws, theories, and principles of physics, chemistry, and biology. This course is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. You will explore how nanomaterials can be integrated into functional devices to greatly improve the next generation of consumer products. Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field of “STEM” (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). A highly interdisciplinary study, nanotechnology embraces concepts from biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and physics, and encompasses the manipulation of very small materials, called “nanomaterials.”

P

This course is designed for college bound students who wish to plan and prepare for the requirements of college admission. Students will work through high school course selection and planning, evaluate the role of the high school transcript, navigate the college application process, identify their top college choices, explore the financial aid process and more. Upon course completion, students will have a portfolio that they can use to showcase their skills and to increase their chances for college acceptance.

The sad news?  One day you won’t live at home anymore.  The good news?  If you take this class, you’ll be prepared for life on your own.  Many students go to college without the necessary tools that they need for managing their money, making simple meals based on good nutritional choices, taking care of their clothes, organizing their “personal space,” and balancing their study and social time.  Get ready for heading out on your own by starting today as you learn the skills that you will need, all while you still live at home.  (And parents, this will be your most favorite class that your teen takes in school because you will benefit from your student moving toward independence and cooking for you for a change.) Come and join in the fun as you “Prepare for Independent Life” starting today.  You’ll be so glad that you did.

The art of public speaking is one that underpins the very foundations of Western society. This course examines those foundations in both Aristotle and Cicero’s views of rhetoric, and then traces those foundations into the modern world. Students will learn not just the theory, but also the practice of effective public speaking, including how to analyze the speeches of others, build a strong argument, and speak with confidence and flair. By the end of this course, students will know exactly what makes a truly successful speech and will be able to put that knowledge to practical use.

Photographs play an important role in our world. We photograph to preserve memories, document events, and create artistic works. This course introduces students to the basics of photography, including camera functions and photo composition. Students will learn what it takes to create a good photograph and how to improve photographs of animals, people, and vacations. They will also begin working with their photographs using photo-editing software. Through a variety of assigned projects, students will engage their creativity by photographing a range of subjects and learning to see the world through the lens of their cameras.

Helping people achieve their goals is one of the most rewarding of human experiences. Peer counselors help individuals reach their goals by offering them support, encouragement, and resource information. This course explains the role of a peer counselor, teaches the observation, listening, and emphatic communication skills that counselors need, and provides basic training in conflict resolution, and group leadership. Not only will this course prepare you for working as a peer counselor, but the skills taught will enhance your ability to communicate effectively in your personal and work relationships.

We believe that life and learning are one and the same. It allows students to express creativity and expand thinking skills. At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to make a live presentation about their project to an audience of their peers. Each Personal Project Portfolio earns 1.0 units of credit for a full-year of participation at three hours per week. One semester of participation at three hours per week earns 0.5 units of credit.

Self-knowledge is the key to self-improvement! More than 800,000 high school students take psychology classes each year. Among the different reasons, there is usually the common theme of self- discovery! Sample topics include the study of infancy, childhood, adolescence, perception and states of consciousness. Amazing online psychology experiments dealing with our own personal behavior are featured within this course.

Personal Psychology II continues the study of self-improvement initiated in Personal Psychology I. Topics include memory, intelligence, emotion, health, stress, and personality. This course features virtual psychology experiments that give students insight into human behavior.

This course will take you on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history! Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters. For example, you’ll read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. You’ll learn about another eccentric who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As you learn about these great thinkers, you’ll come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western Civilization originated. You’ll also get a chance to ask yourself some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered. By the time you’ve “closed the book” on this course, you will better understand yourself and the world around you from atoms to outer space and everything in between.

Food has to travel from the farm to the table, and in Agriculture and Natural Resources, you will learn about all of the steps in that journey, beginning with the history of agriculture through animal husbandry, plant science, and managing our use of natural resources. In this course, you will receive a broad understanding of the subject matter, preparing you for future hands-on learning.

R

What is the best way to care for children and teach them self- confidence and a sense of responsibility? Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. Learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent/child relationships are some of the topics covered in this course.

S

SAT Math is designed to prepare the student to do well on the College Board SAT exam. The course will familiarize the student with the format of the math sections of the SAT and will teach the student testing techniques and strategies. The course will also include a comprehensive review of basic mathematics, algebra, geometry, statistics, and other math concepts needed for success on the SAT. This class is taught by NSA faculty but also extensively uses an outside online source so students can customize their practice and review, according to their individual strengths and weaknesses.

Real world leadership experience is the focus of the i712 Online School’s Student Government team. Members are comprised of three elected officers and confirmed representatives from each grade level, grades 7-12. An election convention is held each year as candidates campaign and gain understanding in a respectful, objective setting-including rechanneling defeat and demonstrating resiliency to become an active, involved, voting members of a decision making body. Officers, representatives, and members actively participate and learn about civic literacy, amend by-laws as needed in an ever evolving student campus, and execute projects that are both community and global oriented.

T

Lights! Camera! Action! This course will introduce students to the basics of film and theater productions. Students will learn about the basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork for both film and theater settings. The course also explores the history of film and theater and the influence that they have had on society. Students will analyze and critique three influential American films, Casablanca, Singing’ in the Rain, and The Wizard of Oz.

Travel Club is not only fun, it’s educational, life enhancing, and develops global awareness and compassion. This club is about both culture and travel as members share their experiences using photos, presentations, and unique perspectives. Engaging activities also explore cultural norms, and possibly absurdities, while identifying food, clothing, architecture, and rituals unique to the culture, country or continent.

V

As animals play an important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. Taking a look at the animals that live in our homes as pets, on our farms as livestock, and those that reside in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, this course will examine some of the common diseases and treatments for animals.

W

In World Mythology, students will explore creation myths, trickster tales and hero journeys from all around the globe. Each lesson will examine a different myth in an integrated study of history, culture, literature and the arts. From ancient Egypt to the Aztec empire, the Chinese to the Celts, students will study how myths are used and interpret their meanings. They will build on fundamental reading comprehension and analytic skills as they journey through museum exhibitions, visit archaeological digs and listen to traditional storytellers.

#

Close your eyes and imagine you’re standing in an art studio—the smell of paint, the heat of the kiln, and the infinite creative possibilities that linger in the air. This is where art is born, and in 2D Studio Art, you’ll learn how to bring your art visions to life. Whatever medium you prefer—painting, drawing, photography—this course will teach you the design elements and principals needed to create a work of art, explore your artistic inspirations, travel back in time to look at art in different cultures, and gain insight about the art of critiquing. If you’ve ever dreamed about making a living as an artist, this course will give you the tools and background that you need to turn those dreams into a reality.